Monday, 29 April 2013

BUFFET DINATOIRE : THE PRELUDE...


I do organise lots and lots of buffets dinatoire (both in France and London), so I do hope my recipes and my advice will be helpful !! but at the end of the day I know that it is personal.
So please feel free to pick and choose...

I will show you in the next few weeks, recipes for two buffets dinatoire : “STAND BY” and “CLEAR ASTERN”.


STAND BY” is a completely cold buffet where no cooking is required at all. Perfect when you have some trouble in your kitchen with your oven and Co, when it is terribly hot, or when you have to organise a buffet in-a-go !!! 
Definitely supersonic !!
You will find : salted cheese-cake, gigantic salads, salted ice-cream or granite, huge tartinades, rillettes and dips, fruit salads with ice-cream…

CLEAR ASTERN” is more sophisticated as you have some cooking involved.

First of all, I do think that the keys for a good buffet dinatoire are DIVERSITY and SUBTLETY. So I do prepare a large selection of dishes for people to pick and taste.

With regards to drinks, I go for:
1)   a nice welcoming cocktail,
2)   Champagne, pink Champagne or Prosecco only (never ever white, rose or red wines -
and plonks ?- Berk ),
3)   Some big jars of homemade orange flower water.

Regarding the cutlery, I do not do plastic (plastic = cheap). Think Concorde...
So the cutlery, plates and glasses are REAL. Believe me, it is so much better. Go to Marks and Spencer, Argos, etc. and buy some plain white plates for example…

Afterwards, a nice decoration (but not too much, less is more), a theme maybe, some good music (very important the music...). I go for 20’s (for the Clara Bow who’s in me…), 30’s or 40’s music. For me it’s perfect as it is not too overpowering.

Finally be in control, be yourself, be happy, and….SMILE.




24 comments:

  1. A very elegant and chic way of treating your guests and yourself. You are right, a good taste and subtlety is the key to a satisfying dinner party. Parties lover

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  2. Yes, I like chic and elegant dinner parties. I hate when the host gives plastic cutlery and disposable plates. I don't want to mention plastic cups for the wine. I went once to a party like this and left earlier than expected feeling cheap and completely dissatisfied, although guests were charming and some very ... handsome. Maria

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    1. Yes, you are definitely right Maria, handsome and plastic does not sound good together… Thank you for your visit. Sixte

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  3. What are the rules for serving wine with food? Which wine should be served with white meat, red meat or fish? I am always confused! Sarah

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    1. This is quite a tricky question actually. Because when you are talking about a meat in general, people forget the vegetables or the gravy they will serve with… And what about the texture of the meat ? Slow cooking ?, rare one ? Every detail counts then, so it can be really complicated at the end…
      First of all, I do not do Rosé. Only during summer time for an apéritif near the pool and with plenty of ice in it…
      For a stew with a rich gravy, I would go for a nice Bourgogne (my favourite is the Nuit Saint-Georges) to counterbalance it…
      For a simple piece of chicken or a steak, I would go for a nice Bordeaux, like a Pauillac or a Saint-Julien.
      Regarding the fish, a white wine from la Vallée du Rhône like a Saint-Joseph or a nice red like a Bourgueil.
      In fine, for my beloved Roquefort cheese (which is terribly strong in France, nearly “aggressive” in your palate), I would go for a Monbazillac, one of the best sweet wine I recommend you (although not too overpowering like a Sauternes or Jurançon might be…).
      Not to forget a nice piece of Cheddar that I will accompanied, why not, by a nice Saumur Champigny…

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  4. White wine with white meat and fish, red wine with red meat. I think I am right here. Correct me, if not. PT

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  5. In my point of view, I think it is a cliché to say that meat goes with red and fish with white. Would you like to make a try ? For a piece of Cod, go for a red wine like a Sancerre or a Chinon ? On the safe side, go for a Bourgogne like a Condrieu. For a piece of (silenced…) lamb, try a red wine like an Irouleguy or reveal it with a good Alsatian white wine like a Tokay (I love this one…). Thank you for your visit. Sixte

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  6. I see... There is more to it than I thought. Thank you, Sixte, for enlightening me. PT

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  7. What wine goes well with venison, please? I got a gift from my hunter friend. It is a wild boar (part of it). I want to serve it as the main meal this Monday. Michael

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  8. Try a Bourgogne like a Pommard or treat yourself with a splendid Griotte-Chambertain, you will not regret it !!! Thank you for your visit Michael ! Sixte

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  9. Thanks, Sixte. Where will I get these wines? In the supermarket or in the small, specialized wine shop? Michael

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  10. Hello Michael. Not in the supermarket, I am afraid. Try Nicolas (French wine Merchant), or any Sandemann... With a little bit of luck, Majestic may have some...Sixte

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  11. I am on my way in search for these wines. Wish me luck. Michael

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    1. Bonne chance Michael ! If you cannot find those wines, try any Pommerol or Cahors wine. Sixte

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  12. Thanks, Sixte. I bought Pomerol Vieux Chateau Brun Bordeaux 2008 at a reasonable price at my local wine merchant. I have a good wine... now I need to prepare a wild boar to match it. Michael

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  13. Hello Michael, I am sure it is going to be great... Sixte

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  14. Yes, Sixte, it was great. The wild boar was a little "wild", but your wine smoothed up the rough edges of the beast. My guests enjoyed your wine a lot. Thanks for you help. Michael

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  15. Hello Michael. Yes, wild boar is... very strong in taste !!! I am happy it all went well... Do not hesitate to ask me next time for a different dish... Sixte

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  16. Hello Sixte, what champagne would you recommend? Lisa

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    1. Hello Lisa, Champagne Morize is the best ever for me. I buy it in the vineyard when in France and their “Cuvée spéciale” and “Cuvée tradition” are a must !!! Light, fluffy, it enchants your palate…

      Any Ruinart but especially the Ruinart pink champagne “Cuvée spéciale".

      For a cheaper alternative, I do like the “Champagne Rose, œil de Perdrix” by VEUVE A. DEVAUX.
      Sixte

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  17. Sixte, why French wines are better than the "new world" ones? Your wine choices are all French. Best, Alex

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    1. Hello Alex, There are for sure many great "new world" wines (e.g. : New Zealand pinot noir…) . It is just that I know the French wines way better and which is why I feel more comfortable suggesting specific ones. Best, Sixte


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  18. Thanks Sixte. Will look for them. Lisa

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